Norman Solovay

Norman Solovay

After serving as Law Secretary to then Appellate Division Justice Charles Breitel , Mr. Solovay for much of his career headed the litigation department of a law firm which served as general counsel to Allen & Company and many corporations it had funded, as well as the Onassis interests  and many other interesting clients drawn by those names.  As a result, it had an unusually large and varied litigation practice for its size and, because its senior partner chaired the American Arbitration Association, Mr. Solovay also came frequently to be involved in arbitrations including a precedent setting long and costly international one. That resulted in an invitation to author the first of three ADR books and ultimately to his present description of himself as a “reformed litigator”  who attempts wherever feasible, to settle even the most contentious disputes including those involved in ongoing litigations.

Mr. Solovay’s frequent service as a mediator and participation as counsel to parties in mediations and as a mediator for the US District Court,, SDNY, led to his election to the National Academy of Distinguished Neutrals which describes him as one of New York’s best mediators and to his recent appointment to the SDNY’s  Committee of Mediation Advisors.  Before being appointed to co-chair the Negotiation Committee when it was first formed, his frequent organizing of programs and authoring articles on Collaborative Law led to an appointment to similarly head the Dispute Resolution Section’s first formed Collaborative Law Committee.  

While Mr. Solovay favors the use of mediation and Collaborative Law whenever feasible, he has also become well known in ADR circles as a pioneering promoter and user of Med-Arb – a now increasingly popular “hybrid” combination of mediation and arbitration – for situations where typical mediation is not appropriate and for use in international arbitrations where it can now be used to obtain the  arbitration award required for enforceability under the New York Convention at a fraction of the time and cost of the typically long running expensive international arbitrations previously thought to be essential for that purpose.