Student Writing Competition

Announcing the Winners of the 2013 Committee on Animals and the Law Student Writing Competition

2013
-- Sixth Annual Student Writing Competition:


First Place - Kristina Fretwell is a student at California Western School of Law,whose expected graduation date is December 2013.  Her winning paper is entitled, “Death by Dog Food: A Critical Examination of Pet Food Regulation in the United States."  Fretwell received $1,000 for her winning submission.

Second Place - Larissa Liebmann is a May 2013 graduate of the American University Washington College of Law.  Her article is entitled " Fraud And First Amendment Protections Of False Speech: How U.S. V. Alvarez Impacts Constitutional Challenges To Ag-Gag Laws."  Liebmann received $500 for her essay.

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PREVIOUS WINNERS:

2012
-- Fifth Annual Student Writing Competition:

First Place - Nicole Pakiz is a student at Vermont Law School, whose graduation is expected in 2012. Her winning paper is entitled, “Why The ALI Should Redraft The Animal-Cruelty Provision Of The Model Penal Code."  Pakiz received $1,000 for her winning submission.

Second Place - Caitlin Giaimo  is a student at Columbia Law School, 3L, whose expected graduation date is May 2013.  Her article is entitled " Caged Speech: The Agricultural Industry’s Gag Legislation And Its Implications For Investigative Journalism."  Giaimo received $500 for her essay.  

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2011
-- Fourth Annual Student Writing Competition

First Place - Véronique Jarrell-King, a student at Vermont Law School, whose graduation is expected in 2012. Her winning paper is entitled, “Wildlife, Water Quality And The Public Trust Doctrine: A Means Of Enforcing Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution Management Plans."  Jarrell-King received $1,000 for her winning submission.

Second Place - Tabitha Nicole Mitchell, a student at University Of Maryland School Of Law whose graduation is expected in 2011.  Her article is entitled "Cage-Free, Free-Range, Organic? Why Animal Welfare Depends On A New Government Labeling Scheme."  She received $500 for her essay. 

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2010
-- Third Annual Student Writing Competition

First Place - Lesley Peterson a student at Brooklyn Law School whose graduation is expected in 2011. Her winning paper entitled, “Talkin' Bout A Humane Revolution:  New Standards For Farming Practices And How They Could Change International Trade As We Know It” explores whether new animal welfare standards, such as California's recent Proposition 2, have the potential to conflict with the World Trade Organization's General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), which reduces trade barriers for goods. Peterson received $1,000 for her winning submission.

Second Place - Dana Marie Pannella,  a student at Case Western University School of Law whose graduation is expected in 2011.  Panella's article entitled "Animals Are Property: The Violation of Soldiers’ Rights to Strays in Iraq" examines the negative impact of Department of Defense's General Order 1B (GO-1B), which prevents soldiers from “[a]dopting as pets or mascots, caring for, or feeding any type of domestic or wild animal,” and how the order conflicts with property law and public policy. She proposes that GO-1B be revised to allow the adoption of stray domestic animals. She received $500 for her essay.

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2009
-- Second Annual Student Writing Competition

First Place - Allison L. Westfahl Kong, a student at New York University Law School whose graduation is expected in 2010.  Her submission entitled “Improving the Protection of Species Endangered in the United States by Means of a Revision of the Distinct Population Segment (DPS) Policy,” explores whether the DPS, a portion of a species' or subspecies' population or range, should be revised to permit the listings of species that are solely endangered within the United States and whether such a change is consistent with the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Kong received $1,000 for her winning submission.

Second Place - Andra Waniek, a recent graduate of Brooklyn Law School. Her paper “Protecting Woman's Best Friend from Family Violence: Proposal for a Model Statute Including Animals in Protective Orders,” discusses and reviews proposed and enacted legislation concerning inclusion of animals in protective orders. Waniek proposes a federal statute authorizing the inclusion of animals in protective orders that combines and modifies components of several proposed and enacted state statutes and adds a new provision to account for the housing of animals during their owners' stay at domestic violence shelters. Waniek received $500 for her essay.

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2008
-- First Annual Student Writing Competition

First place - Laurel McNeill, 
a student at Hofstra University School of Law, whose graduation is expected in 2010.  Her submission, entitled “Giant Steps: The African Elephant and the United States’ Effect on The Survival of The Species”, examined the United States’ laws and agencies responsible for perpetuating the existence of the elephant, and suggested ways of doing more.  Of all the submissions, this particular submission exhibited the highest quality of research, the most accurate and clear analysis and best technical writing.

Second place - Rachel Wechsler, a student at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, 2009.

Third place - Deborah Dubow Press, a student at Cornell Law School, 2009.